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A Hybrid Constant and Oscillatory Field Ion Mobility Analyzer Using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

TitleA Hybrid Constant and Oscillatory Field Ion Mobility Analyzer Using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsPrabhakaran A., Hamid A.M, Garimella S.VB, Valenzuela B.R, Ewing R.G, Ibrahim Y.M, Smith R.D
JournalJ. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom.
Abstract

Here we explore the combination of constant and oscillatory fields applied in a single device to affect the continuous separation and filtering of ions based on their mobilities. The device explored allows confining and manipulating ions utilizing a combination of radio frequency (rf), direct current (DC) fields, and traveling waves (TW) in a structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM) module. We have investigated theoretically and experimentally a concept for continuous filtering of ions based on their mobilities where ions are mobility separated and selected by passage through two regions, both of which incorporated combined TW and constant fields providing opposing forces on the ions. The SLIM module was composed of two surfaces with mirror-image arrays of electrodes and had two regions where the different TW and opposing DC fields could be applied. The filtering capabilities are determined by the applied DC gradient and the TW parameters, such as speed, amplitude, and the TW sequence (i.e., the duty cycle of the traveling wave). The effects of different parameters on the sensitivity and the ion mobility (IM) resolution of the device have been investigated. By appropriately choosing the DC gradient and TW parameters for the two sections, it is possible to transmit ions of a selected mobility while filtering out others of both higher and lower mobility. The novel device described here provides a basis for the targeted analysis of compounds based upon the continuous selection of ions according to their mobility and without the need for high electric fields or pulsed injection. Graphical abstract á…Ÿ.

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